City of LA Bicycle Parking Draft Ordinance Now Available

February 18, 2011 at 2:58 pm | Posted in Bike News, Get Involved | 12 Comments
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In this time of limited resources and ever shrinking city staffs – LACBC is harnessing the talents of urban planning and public policy graduate students from our local universities and linking them with cities to take on many of the bicycle and pedestrian planning and policy issues faced by cities and provide them with much needed research. We’ve already begun working on tackling some of the policies and programs outlined in the City of LA Draft Bike Plan utilizing several graduate student researchers/interns.

LACBC Researcher Rye Baerg

Rye Baerg, UCLA Urban Planning Masters Student, LACBC researcher and City Planning Intern, is currently working with the Code Studies division of the Los Angeles Department of City Planning to implement a revision of the bicycle parking ordinance in the Los Angeles Zoning Code. Currently the City of LA only requires bicycle parking for commercial and industrial uses at a rate of 2% of automobile uses in buildings over 10,000 sq. ft.  For most commercial uses this results in one space being provided per 25,000 square feet.  So, if you’ve been wondering why there never seems to be adequate bicycle parking when you need to lock up, now you know.  Rye and City Planning have drafted a proposed ordinance with input from various city departments and are now soliciting input from all of us and the broader LA community on the draft.

The highlights from the draft ordinance include:
•       Expanding existing requirements to multifamily residential buildings
•       Requiring a minimum for both short and long-term bicycle parking
•       Raising the level of required bicycle parking
•       Expanding design and siting criteria including lighting, signage,
and access requirements
•       Including definitions for both short and long-term bicycle parking

As of today Planning has a discussion draft of proposed ordinance available for public comment for the next 60 days. Planning will be holding a public hearing on March 30th at City Hall in room 1010, where they will provide a presentation on the ordinance.  In early April Rye will be presenting to the LA Bicycle Advisory Committee (BAC) on the ordinance.  Over the next few weeks Rye and City Planning will schedule some additional outreach meetings with stakeholders and at the end of the 60 day public comment period Planning will then revise the draft and present it to the City Planning Commission.

We plan to publish Rye’s research report in late June on our website.  Rye’s report will examine bicycle parking policies and best practices from around the country – we hope his research can influence better bicycle parking ordinances in cities across the county.

To view the purposed ordinance click here: Bicycle Parking Public Notification Packet

To submit comments on the ordinance contact Tom Rothmann at LA City Planning:

tom.rothmann@lacity.org - 213-978-1891

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12 Comments »

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  1. Go Rye!

  2. [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Nate Baird and Christopher Kidd, LACntyBikeCoalition. LACntyBikeCoalition said: More #bikeLA parking news today! City of LA Bicycle Parking Draft Ordinance now available online: http://t.co/H4vNR6L [...]

  3. [...] is working with L.A. Planning and UCLA Urban Planning Masters Student Rye Baerg to develop a new bicycle parking draft ordinance. Jessica Meaney calls for more inclusive transportation planning. Chris at (just) Riding Along [...]

  4. Let’s not forget Josef Bray-Ali’s insightful article on the relationship among parking requirements, the bike parking swap, development, and community (published in the Los Angeles Business Journal):

    Putting Parking in Its Place

    Even this draft doesn’t go far enough towards rationalizing parking policies in Los Angeles.

  5. [...] document when Rye gave his presentation; some details may change in the official draft.  The LACBC put together an excellent post when the draft ordinance was released for comment earlier this month.  You can also read the draft [...]

  6. Weak!

    These are weak!

    5% to 10% of car parking?

    No more than 10% of car parking swapped with bike parking?

    Come on, bump up that ratio and watch small lot development in accordance with numerous specific plans take off, even in a down-turning recession. Parking costs suppress the development of Los Angeles’ historic retail areas (along with shitty auto-centric road designs).

    Let the developer, property owner and architect do their own economic calculations. God forbid a building would be “underparked” for cars and over-parked for bikes (a massive cost savings).

  7. Thanks for the comments. If you want them to go in the public record please forward them to Tom Rothmann at the email listed above. As part of our outreach we will be showing how these requirements compare to those in other cities at the public meetings. I therefore, strongly encourage anyone with comments to attend either the Hearing Officer Hearing or the BAC meeting to discuss this topic further.

  8. @Josef.

    It’s guaranteed there is a political calculus limiting this ordinance. Anything that’s seen as a big reform will be dead on the table. LA can and should reform its parking minimums (ahem – I think we should eliminate them), but I don’t think Rye has been tasked to do that.

    Keep in mind that lots of Valley homeowners and fearful NIMBYs see parking requirements as a powerful tool to drive up the cost of development, and thus prevent it from taking place in their hood. It’s a reprehensible logic, but one that has a lot of backers in this city. I think that in order to take on car parking requirements, we’re gonna need a concerted campaign, a coalition of affordable housing advocates and alternative transportation folk and clear air and water advocates. I see this taking place at the neighborhood council level, where we allow some neighborhoods to choose to reduce or eliminate their minimums. Politically, it’d be a tough sell to just reform car parking citywide. I’m just telling it as I perceive it.

    I see the bike parking ordinance as more of a way to chip away at car parking requirements, while fixing the truly weak bike parking requirements we have now, which allow pretty big commercial developments – like grocery stores or movie theatres – to provide no bike parking. Commercial development under 10,000 square feet has NO bike parking requirement now.

    In short, I agree with you that we could do more, but I definitely support this ordinance as a big improvement over the dearth of bike parking developers currently provide.

  9. [...] Department of City Planning will hold a hearing on expanding requirements for bicycle parking on Wednesday, March 30th at 1 pm in Room 1010 of L.A. City Hall, 200 North Spring [...]

  10. [...] Department of City Planning will hold a hearing on expanding requirements for bicycle parking on Wednesday, March 30th at 1 pm in Room 1010 of L.A. City Hall, 200 North Spring [...]

  11. [...] an ordinance to beef up bicycle parking requirements for new developments.  Flying Pigeon and LACBC have also spilled virtual ink describing the proposed ordinance, and rightly so; this is an [...]

  12. [...] covered in previous months on LADOT Bike Blog, LACBC’s blog, and Streetsblog, City Planning has been working on a proposal to beef up the requirements for [...]


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